Alan Hargreaves' Blog

The ramblings of an Australian SaND TSC* Principal Field Technologist

Enterprise Unix Roundup: 2004, the Year of the Ferment

Michael Hall has written up his Enterprise Unix Roundup for 2004 at Serverwatch.

I’ve been reading prior articles from Michael, and it’s nice to see that it looks like he is coming to the belief that we are not to be written off yet. In fact the title for the portion on Sun is “Sun: Not Dead, Maybe Even Renewing Itself“.

He’s also become far less skeptical about the Open Sourcing of Solaris, although there still appears to be the feeling that we are going to “… keep firm control over the OS”. Being involved in the pilot and seeing the direction in which we are going convinces me otherwise, but I guess we’ll just have to let the community and the press draw their own conclusions once the license is announced and the Open Sourcing formally launched.

I think that the final paragraph is worth quoting.

In the end, although Sun’s two most positive actions this year were its push to stress the technical merits of Solaris (with an attendant promise to focus on its neglected Solaris x86), and its partnership with AMD to x86 hardware to market. The former means Unix on the whole will continue to move forward, and the latter represents good timing on Sun’s part, as Intel’s Itanium founders in the face of AMD’s Opteron assault.

Advertisements

Written by Alan

December 30, 2004 at 1:56 pm

Posted in Solaris

7 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Will we ever see a mea culpa out of the folks in the press if/when the facts prove otherwise?

    John Clingan

    December 30, 2004 at 8:24 pm

  2. Well I’ve seen a few folks in various places who have committed to reserving judgement and eating crow if it is appropriate. Like you said, we’ll have to see.

    Alan Hargreaves

    December 30, 2004 at 8:28 pm

  3. [Trackback] Enterprise Unix Roundup: 2004, the Year of Ferment:
    However, this is the first year in a few we found ourselves thinking there’s a future for Unix beyond Linux. 2004 was about putting the pieces in place; in 2005 those pieces will need to go into …

    c0t0d0s0.org

    December 30, 2004 at 10:48 pm

  4. I’m ok with people saying we’re going to control the operating system
    as long as they make the <span
    style=”font-weight: bold; color: rgb(153, 0, 0);”>very important
    distinction</span> that it’s Sun’s Solaris <span
    style=”font-weight: bold; color: rgb(153, 0, 0);”>product </span>we
    are controlling, not the community or the community’s ability to
    innovate and contribute.

    People ask me this all the time, and how I explain it is that Sun will
    continue to sell a fully supported and branded Solaris product. That
    doesn’t change. We control that. However, we will now be doing our
    development in the open and taking a variety of contributions from the
    Solaris community, which, of course, will be fully enfranchised with an
    OSI-approved license. In other words, we are building a genuine open
    source community that Sun leads, contributes to, and bases its product
    on. The community will generate innovations that will lead to the
    enhancement Sun’s Solaris product as well as the creation of other
    products and services based on OpenSolaris that various community
    members or companies will drive and profit from.

    Most people in the press are not making the distinction between <span
    style=”font-weight: bold; color: rgb(153, 0, 0);”>product</span> and <span
    style=”font-weight: bold; color: rgb(153, 0, 0);”>community</span> at
    this time. They will, though.

    Jim

    Jim

    December 31, 2004 at 12:03 am

  5. He excluded HP UX and AIX for 2 years in a row.
    Despite the marketing support of Linux, both HP and IBM still favour HP-UX and AIX. They are pushing their enterprise UNIX aggressively, and not this open source movement.
    I wonder what makes him think that HP-UX and AIX are dead. Perhaps he believes the techno-marketing whitepaper.

    iwan ang

    December 31, 2004 at 3:35 am

  6. [Trackback] Joerg Moellenkamp
    20535 Hamburg
    E-Mail: joerg@c0t0d0s0.org
    Internet: http://www.c0t0d0s0.org
    Inhaltlich Verantwortlicher gem�� � 10 Absatz 3 MDStV: Joerg Moellenkamp (Anschrift wie oben)
    Hinweise:
    1. Trotz sorgf�ltiger inhaltlicher Kontrolle …

    c0t0d0s0.org

    January 7, 2005 at 4:12 am

  7. Will we ever see a mea culpa out of the folks in the press if/when the facts prove otherwise?
    I try to make it a point to go back when I’m proven wrong and admit it, so although I’m not sure what it is I stand to be “proven wrong” about, if one of you cares to write and say “You were wrong and here are the reasons” I’ll certainly give it a hard look.

    I’m ok with people saying we’re going to control the operating system as long as they make the very important distinction that it’s Sun’s Solaris product we are controlling, not the community or the community’s ability to innovate and contribute.
    Well, I’ll already express regret that I haven’t worked hard enough to make that distinction. And I’d be happy to get some pointers on where I can see that community dynamic in action once it’s up to speed.
    I wonder what makes him think that HP-UX and AIX are dead.
    I didn’t say they’re dead, and I don’t think it’s “the open source movement” that’s of interest.
    I said that Sun is the company most aggressively pushing back on Linux. HP and IBM are not. So in terms of perceived market momentum, Linux has it and Sun’s clearly trying to arrest that, and that’s where the “Linux vs. Proprietary Unix” story is at. The others are looking for something like peaceful coexistence. Sun seems to be placing less emphasis on the peaceful part, and much more interested in some of what HP & IBM have pretty much ceded to Linux down in the x86 market. Maybe I’m wrong with that impression, but please don’t put words in my mouth.

    Michael Hall

    January 17, 2005 at 10:48 am


Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: